Thursday, February 25, 2016

Vesey's newest beet

                                                 
                                                   
These topics can dawn on me when at the most random places or even when in the middle of a conversation.  I was downtown at Starbucks enjoying my usual coconut milk latte and decided that it would be a good idea to make mention of some new vegetable and flower varieties that I feel are top quality and worthy of an extra introduction for this upcoming gardening season. Sometimes I even sit at coffee shops with my laptop while writing these blogs and sip on a nice hot drink on a cold winters day.  I'm not sure why...but this setting is great therapy and inspires me while I think about gardening. And of course gardening is great therapy as well! It is my pleasure to highlight on some of the newest seed items that are so worthy of being included in this year's 2016 Vesey's Seeds catalogue.  I'm hoping that while reading this future introduction that it will provide you with new, as well as additional information, of this variety you may never thought about and also to help with making your selections easier.

With spring just around the corner... hopefully.  Now is a great time to plan your selections of varieties of different vegetables that you may like to grow as reliables or perhaps you may be adventurous and would like to try something more "non-traditional". I know and can appreciate that gardeners like to stay with what they know will be successful as they spend the money and time trying to grow their plants from year to year. It gives me great comfort in letting you know about some of the newest varieties of vegetables of the "future" that we are confident will work in your own home garden as we have grown them right here on site in our own trial garden's at Veseys.

The veggie variety that I'm happy to introduce is called Avalanche Beet..one of the most unique changes in a beet since the golden ones were introduced. This new variety of beet is unique because of its colour. It is a beet that is white in colour and that will likely explain where the name came from. You may have already tried it in your own garden or know of someone who did, but I would like to share a little bit about why I think this vegetable is one that I can recommend for you to give a try if you are one of those more adventurous gardeners.
                                                   

I can understand that if you only have a certain amount of space in your garden that trying something new may be a little harder to accommodate for, however this type of vegetable doesn't take up a whole lot of extra room. Even if you were to try a small area in your garden with this new variety, you could still grow your own reliable variety as well. This is what I will usually recommend to gardeners when they want to make a switch to something new, especially first time gardeners.

As I mentioned, Avalanche beet is named perfectly for its clean,white flesh. It won an award at the All America Selections trials in 2015!  It is a hybrid beet that we were so impressed with in our own trials as well. This made the decision easy for us to include in our 2016 newest line up.  It boasts a well rounded 3 inch uniform root, with upright light green leaves and has excellent disease resistance.  It's actually supposed to taste really good when eating raw as well, almost like a hint of sweetness. I know this may sound very odd to try eating it raw, but don't knock it before you try it! Eating this particular variety raw has actually turned "beet dislike-rs" into "beet lovers", OK well at least "beet likers".
                                               


The real highlight about this type of beet when compared to the red beet types, is that it is non-staining or bleeding when peeling or cooking, but still has the same great flavour.  Many people will grow all three types red, gold and white as they all pair well together. You can go onto our Vesey's YouTube channel by following this link so learn of the interesting comparisons of each type. This hybrid has a maturity date of only 55-60 days and is available for ordering now.

Beets are a cool season crop and can be sown in the spring as soon as the ground can be worked.  If you can't get them planted at this time, they will do well also when sown in late summer to early fall and this will suit you if you are one of the lucky ones that can guarantee a mild fall/early winter. Beets do tolerate somewhat cooler temperatures and that is why it is suggested as an early spring planting. You can also grow beets as a succession planting, this basically means that they can be sown every 3 to 4 weeks for a longer season of harvests.

There are so many ways you can can eat/prepare when it comes to beets.  Whether they are crushed,juiced, mashed with or without olive oil, pickled, salted or roasted.  They are simply delicious!  A new way to have beets is to slice them and then roast them to compliment a sandwich topped with goat cheese, yummy! You can shred them either into a risotto, soup or as a slaw in place of other vegetables or to accompany other types. They can be grilled on the BBQ this coming season or used in your fave hummus recipe in place of chickpeas as a low calorie alternative. Some have even made a salsa using beets as well as being found as a top ingredient in the famous red velvet cake.  So many uses and there are certainly more that I haven't even mentioned.
                                             


Our website has lots of information on how to grow beets, lists of beet varieties as well as any type of fertilizers and amendments that you feel you need to make this crop grow successful.  Feel free to contact us here at Veseys if you have any further questions about this beet or any other gardening inquiries you may have.  We love hearing from you at any time.  You can check out our Vesey's facebook page and go on and like us as you learn from all kinds of other gardeners and hear their stories as well.

You will be sure to beet any winter blues as you get excited about the spring!
                                                 





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